10 Best Indie Craft Shows in the Eastern and Southern Regions

We've done our fair share of craft shows over the years that 1767 has been in business, and we love them because they're great ways to connect with new customers and meet makers from other cities. Whether you're a shopper who wants to invest in some awesome handmade goods or even a new maker who is just starting the craft show circuit for the first time, here are our personal favorite indie craft shows in the Southern and East Coast regions. 

  • Porter Flea (Nashville) - This is by far our favorite craft show every year, and not just because it's in our home city. Porter Flea is held twice a year (once in the summer and once around Christmas), and it always draws a huge crowd of both makers and shoppers. 
Porter Flea | Image via ginkaville

Porter Flea | Image via ginkaville

  • Made Market (Louisville, KY) - Made Market takes place at the end of the summer at the Pointe in Louisville, a warehouse-style building that's full of exposed brick, high ceilings and other charming details that make it an enjoyable place to spend the day shopping. 
  • Indie Craft Experience (Atlanta, GA) - Indie Craft Experience is a series of ongoing craft shows in the Atlanta area. The Holiday Market is, of course, the largest of them all, but there are also pop-up markets during the summer and fall months. 
  • Crafty Bastards (Washington, DC) - This one is held every fall in DC at the popular Union Market. It's an outdoor show, and it boasts more than 30,000 shoppers throughout the weekend. This year, they're even expanding to include a fall date right here in Nashville. 
Crafty Bastards | Image via WTOP

Crafty Bastards | Image via WTOP

  • Renegade (Nationwide) - With locations in New York, Denver, Portland, Seattle, LA, Chicago, Austin and even London, Renegade is one of the biggies. We always try to make it to at least one of the Chicago dates every year.
Renegade Craft Fair | image via squareup

Renegade Craft Fair | image via squareup

  • Indie Craft Parade (Greenville, SC) - This one is held in early fall at the Huguenot Mill in downtown Greenville. It has an intimate feel, and all of the makers are from the Southern states. 
  • Handmade Arcade (Pittsburgh, PA) - This is the largest indie craft fair in Pittsburgh, and it's always held a few weeks before Christmas at the downtown David L. Lawrence Convention Center.
  • Indie South (Southeast region) - This is a series of craft shows with locations in Athens, GA, Columbia, SC, Chattanooga, TN, and Nashville, TN. Instead of taking place once or twice a year, it offers lots of smaller events throughout the year. 
  • Urban Craft Fair (Detroit, MI) - Urban Craft Fair is a holiday market held at the Masonic Temple in Detroit. There are 100+ maker booths and a always a ton of shoppers. 
  • Made South (Franklin, TN) - This one is also exclusive to Southern makers, and it has a subscription service that goes along with the annual holiday market. It's a great way to put names to faces behind your favorite handmade brands. 

How to Series: Style Your Home Using Macramé Plant Hangers

Wooden wall art and furniture may be our main game, but it's no secret that we love styling beautiful interiors as a whole. There are a few other classic décor items that we think look perfect paired with our 1767 pieces; one of those items is the ‘70s-style macramé plant hanger. This timeless, kitschy item is a must-have in the plant-filled house, and it's a handy way to hang your plants in small spaces. Here are a few ways that we love decorating with the macramé plant hanger.

  • Hang herb pots in the kitchen. No space on the windowsill for herbs? Add some fresh, flavorful zest to your dishes by growing basil, cilantro and other herbs in macramé hangers right in front of the sunniest spot in your kitchen.
  • Clean up the air in your bathroom. Keep your bathroom a bit fresher by hanging plant hangers near the window or even in the shower. Choose a plant that is especially good at cleaning the air, such as a spider plant or ficus.

  • Dress up your windows. Curtains can block out sunlight, and if you don’t have much to spare, you’re likely always looking for ways to allow more light into your room. Instead, hang some macramé plant hangers filled with air plants or draped vines from your window’s curtain rods. 

image:  Wit & Whistle
  • Take them outdoors. While most people think of macramé plant hangers as indoor items, they're actually incredibly durable, which makes them perfect for displaying plants on a porch or patio.

  • Think outside the plant. Instead of using your macramé hangers for plants, use them to display something else entirely. Think bowls of fruit, glass terrariums or other found objects. 

1767 x Urban Cowboy

We’re so excited to finally announce a (somewhat) secret project that we’ve been working on for the past few months: the Nashville location of the Brooklyn-based Urban Cowboy B&B. If you’re an Instagram user or someone who frequently peruses design blogs, you’ve likely seen Urban Cowboy’s exposed wood beams and Southwestern décor popping up all over the Internet, so we were thrilled when they asked us to be a part of their expansion from New York to Nashville.

Urban Cowboy owner Lyon Porter purchased a Victorian mansion in the city's up-and-coming East Nashville neighborhood that was once used as a more traditional B&B. A little over 8 months after our initial conversation, the stuffy, unused building is now the site of one of the most unique and personality-filled hotel alternatives in town — and we couldn’t be prouder to say that our art and woodwork plays a part in many of Urban Cowboy Nashville’s rooms. If you’re planning on checking it out on your next trip through Nashville (or even booking a staycation for adventurous locals), be sure to keep your eyes peeled for these custom 1767 pieces.

12' x 10' Installation art piece in the main foyer of the mansion.

12' x 10' Installation art piece in the main foyer of the mansion.

This custom wall is made of a decent amount of copper and a hell of a lot of wood. All of the wood that we used was sourced from the home's original walls (that's our jam, as you know), and the copper was Urban Cowboy owner Lyon's idea. While we had never worked with copper prior to this project, we met the challenge head-on (also kind of our jam). We built and tore down the wall's center design four times before it felt right, but it was well worth it in the end. 

Copper and reclaimed wood artwork above the fireplace in the music parlor of The Cowboy.

Copper and reclaimed wood artwork above the fireplace in the music parlor of The Cowboy.

Copper and reclaimed wood artwork above the fireplace in the main parlor of The Cowboy.

Copper and reclaimed wood artwork above the fireplace in the main parlor of The Cowboy.

Lyon liked the copper look so much that he wanted to extend it throughout the rest of the house. These copper and wood mantles sit in the communal spaces on the first floor. 

Door headdress in 'The Swing' Bedroom.

Door headdress in 'The Swing' Bedroom.

We brought the same design as the mantle covers to add some shine above the doors (with the help of our now-good friend Clinton Van Gemert of Printsburgh). The piece worked around Clint's already amazing handmade wallpaper installations.

Reclaimed Oak bed and patterned copper headboard in 'The Swing' Bedroom.

Reclaimed Oak bed and patterned copper headboard in 'The Swing' Bedroom.

Reclaimed wood bed with patterned copper head and footboards in 'The Muse' Bedroom.

Reclaimed wood bed with patterned copper head and footboards in 'The Muse' Bedroom.

What's a great bed without a great headboard? We worked with Lyon to design custom headboards for all of the beds in the Cowboy. Some of them are solid copper in starburst shapes, while others extend all the way to the ceiling. 

Reclaimed wood and copper installation headboard and footboard in 'The Lion's Den' Suite.

Reclaimed wood and copper installation headboard and footboard in 'The Lion's Den' Suite.

Reclaimed charred Heart Pine bed in 'The Midnight Rider' Bedroom.

Reclaimed charred Heart Pine bed in 'The Midnight Rider' Bedroom.

Urban Cowboy's initial credo was to create a space for artists, musicians and interesting people of all kinds to gather, and that's an idea we can certainly get behind. We couldn't be happier to see 1767 pieces find a home in this inspiring space (and now that the work is done, to curl up in one of those rooms ourselves!).