Road Trip to Chattanooga With Treetop Hideaways

After the craziness of Porter Flea (our largest market of the year), our design and marketing team needed a little break and a bit of a creative reset. We've had our eyes on Chattanooga for some time now, and since it's only a little under two hours from Nashville, we decided to hit the road for some R&R in the mountains.

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We reached out to a local company called Treetop Hideaways after seeing their modern treehouses on Instagram and they kindly let us take over their beautiful Elements Treehouse for the weekend. It was the perfect place for us to recharge our creative batteries. We found ourselves pretty well aligned with their mission because just like we recycle wood from Nashville's old homes to create our wall art, the Treetop Hideaways team incorporates reclaimed barn wood, antique windows and an old-fashioned, barn-raising construction style to create a modern look in their two treehouses.

The treehouse that we stayed in was cozy but spacious, with an open floor plan, tiny kitchen and one of the most luxurious showers we've seen just about anywhere (there's a mature tree growing up right through the center of it!). Upstairs, there's a loft space with skylights that allowed us to watch the rain fall during the night. 

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While we mostly stayed cozied up in the treehouse enjoying the serenity and the beautiful view of Lookout Mountain, we ventured into Chattanooga for dinner and drinks at the Dwell Hotel and breakfast in the morning at The Bitter Alibi, both of which were delicious. We did some window shopping along Frazier Avenue, and we found some seriously good denim at Collective Clothing

On our last day we peeked over at the other treehouse next to ours and lusted over the floor-to-ceiling windows and the way-up-high deck. We'll definitely be back for another stay with Treetop Hideaways, and if you'd like to book your own stay, you can find them online here

This post was written in partnership with Treetop Hideaways. We received a free stay in exchange for our honest review. 

Porter Flea Summer Market 2018

Porter Flea weekends are always some the biggest weekends of the year for us, and we're so excited to unveil what we've been working on for this year's summer market. If you've never been, the event is Nashville's biggest handmade market, and this year it takes place at the Nashville Fairgrounds on June 29th and 30th. 

We have some fun things in mind for our booth this year, and we'll be sharing a ton of one-of-a-kind pieces just for Porter Flea. Whether you're interested in checking out our stuff in person, shopping the pieces that we'll have on site or even commissioning a custom piece or a full-on design job, we'd love to talk IRL! 

We're bringing along 80+ brand new pieces, about half of which are totally one-of-a-kind. We'll also have a few furniture items, including plant stands, tables and more. Here's a little glimpse of some of the pieces we'll have with us at Porter Flea:

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Design and Build: Mojo's Tacos in Franklin, TN

We're excited to show you guys a first look at a project we've been working on for a while. The folks at Powell Architects brought us on to collaborate with them on a design and build for Mojo's Tacos in Franklin, TN (just outside of Nashville).

This is the first project we've worked on with Powell Architects, but we think they knocked it out of the park as far as designing a welcoming, fun space with cool accents throughout. Mojo's Tacos is located in the Factory at Franklin, a sort of mall-type building with lots of local businesses and restaurants inside. It's the perfect spot for a beer with friends or some seriously good tacos while you shop. 

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For the project, we did a few wood accents throughout the restaurant, all with pops of blue and hammered copper for a Southwestern vibe. The wood installations include a 40-foot bar front, a 12-foot-tall back bar and the custom Mojo's Tacos signage out front. This was a local Nashville project through and through, as we also collaborated with fellow makers I Saw the Sign and FLWR Shop to add some really colorful and unique details. 

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While we love designing and creating our own pieces in our shop, getting to go out into areas around Nashville and work with other companies is becoming one of our favorite aspects of the work we do. Mojo's Tacos is a true labor of friendship and we can't wait to hopefully work alongside these talented people again in the near future. 

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How-To Series: Mix Vintage Pieces With New Buys

While we'd all love to have a perfectly curated home filled with one-of-a-kind vintage finds, in real life, this often just doesn't always work out. That incredible collection of vintage glassware won't hold up to everyday dining and entertaining, that sleek mid-century modern sofa doesn't feel as comfortable as a modern, deep-seated style, and if you have kids, there are a number off essentials that you just kind of have to buy new. We get it — but that being said, we still think there's a way to mix old and new in a way that functions well in your home. Here's how. 

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  • Invest in sturdy, well-crafted furniture that will last a lifetime. While some vintage buys are impractical and too delicate to use every day, other types of antique furniture items are actually more durable than their modern counterparts. Check Craigslist or a local vintage shop for solid wood dressers, credenzas or even bed frames that you can snag for a bargain — and best of all, these are the OG versions of the ones being sold at those pricey designer furniture stores, so you'll get the same look for less. 
  • Mix white, modern furniture with vintage wooden pieces. Now that you have a few mid-century pieces or classic farmhouse buys, you'll likely want to mix in functional, multipurpose items to keep the look feeling fresh. If you're unsure of how to mix and match furniture, we think that white always looks good with everything. In the bedroom, for example, you might mix a modern Ikea bed frame with a timeless vintage dresser, or in the dining room, add a low white buffet to offset your rustic dining table. It's all about allowing the vintage pieces to do the heavy aesthetic lifting while letting the modern budget furniture work as your day-to-day storage.
  • Incorporate vintage textiles with new furniture items. Do you have a cheap couch from your college days or a set of patio furniture that feels pretty bland? Adding vintage textiles in the form of Persian rugs, kilim throw pillows and re-purposed mudcloth fabric is an easy way to transform the look of a furniture piece you're not so fond of. 
  • When in doubt, go for vintage lighting. Even if you live in a rental and you're working with a pretty sterile-feeling bathroom, you can easily make over a whole room simply by adding vintage lighting. Replace boring wall sconces or ceiling fixtures with vintage milk glass pendants or Edison bulbs, add a '50s-style lamp on top of an otherwise plain dresser or place an eye-catching arc lamp next to your living room setup to bring down the mood and up the style in any room.
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Metalworking, Steel Fabrication, Custom Furniture & More

We've been giving you guys a look inside our process since the very beginning of 1767, and for the past couple of years, that's meant our growth into custom furniture and design work. We recently added a metalsmith to our team, which has opened a lot of creative doors and made it possible for us to make some pretty huge goals a reality. 

Our friend and studio-mate Joey Verzilli of Lockeland Leatherworks created this video for us to show the expanse of our metalworking capabilities and what we can create using metal and steel (and wood, of course). From custom furniture designed and built for your home or business to installations and complete build-outs, our metalwork marks the future of 1767.

Our Favorite Things: April 2018

Spring just couldn't decide whether or not it wanted to stick around this month, and winter keeps reappearing with the occasional 40-degree Nashville day full of blustery rain. It's been a month of transition, both in the weather and in our company: transitioning our business from the reclaimed wood art world to the design-and-build world, transitioning our retail space into something a bit more like a showroom, and always transitioning our creative process to fit our current goals. In between planning, reevaluating and daydreaming, these things brought us inspiration (and relaxation) this month. 

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via Japanese Trash

  • Design books. We went wild on Amazon this month and scooped up tons of beautiful, design-heavy books on our favorite (and soon-to-be favorite) architects. The biggies like Frank Lloyd Wright and Charles and Bernice Eames were definitely in the mix, but we also found some books about new architects that we weren't so familiar with, like this, this and this
  • Dark green walls. We've been slowly renovating our own home for the past year or so, tackling larger projects over a weekend and maybe working on something smaller late on weeknights. We recently added a dark green accent wall to our bathroom after seeing tons of inspiration all over our favorite blogs. 
  • Backgammon. What's your favorite way to relieve stress? Aside from the occasional Negroni or a night cooking dinner at home, playing backgammon has definitely become part of our weekend stress relief routine. 
  • Japanese travel. We're endlessly inspired by the simplicity and serenity of Japan's homes, landscapes and culture, and we've been dreaming of taking a trip all over the Japan. Remodelista's travel guide is especially inspiring.  
  • Drake. We only love our bed and our mama... and the new(ish) Drake song. We're sorry.

Architect Spotlight: Richard Neutra

We look for inspiration in lots of different places, but there's no better place to go for inspiration than straight to the source. When 1767 started moving into the design world, we began learning all we could about history's best architects, picking up bits and pieces of their styles and finding new and creative ways to approach our own projects.

We frequently post inspirational shots from these architects over on our Instagram page, and lots of you seemed just as interested in them as we are. That's when we got the idea to feature one of our favorite architects each month here on our blog to help share what we're learning, show you where our inspiration comes from and (of course) give you some serious #HousePorn to look at. 

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Our first featured architect is Richard Neutra — master of modernism, lover of art and fellow Californian (though he was originally born in Austria). Neutra worked briefly under Frank Lloyd Wright, but he owes most of his education in architecture to European architects like Gustav AmmannErich Mendelsohn and Rudolf Schindler. Neutra worked under Schindler in Southern California in the mid 1920s, and the work that they created together was so far ahead of its time, we'd swear it was from the mid century. 

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Neutra first worked as a landscape architect when he arrived in California, designing gardens throughout areas like Newport Beach and Hollywood. After his architecture skills began catching up with his mentor Rudolf Schindler, the two went into business together (along with Carol Aronovici) to form the Architectural Group for Industry and Commerce, or AGIC. Their work was geometric, yet airy and open, creating what became known as the West Coast answer to the mid-century modern style. 

We love that Neutra emphasized function for the client, not just style — he was known for asking endless lists of questions before beginning any build so that he could really understand how the family would use the home. He created multipurpose rooms, blended the landscape into the home's design and made the floor plans open, accessible and airy. In a Los Angeles Times interview, Neutra famously called his homes "ready-for-anything".

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