Our Favorite Things: April 2018

Spring just couldn't decide whether or not it wanted to stick around this month, and winter keeps reappearing with the occasional 40-degree Nashville day full of blustery rain. It's been a month of transition, both in the weather and in our company: transitioning our business from the reclaimed wood art world to the design-and-build world, transitioning our retail space into something a bit more like a showroom, and always transitioning our creative process to fit our current goals. In between planning, reevaluating and daydreaming, these things brought us inspiration (and relaxation) this month. 

 via Japanese Trash

via Japanese Trash

  • Design books. We went wild on Amazon this month and scooped up tons of beautiful, design-heavy books on our favorite (and soon-to-be favorite) architects. The biggies like Frank Lloyd Wright and Charles and Bernice Eames were definitely in the mix, but we also found some books about new architects that we weren't so familiar with, like this, this and this
  • Dark green walls. We've been slowly renovating our own home for the past year or so, tackling larger projects over a weekend and maybe working on something smaller late on weeknights. We recently added a dark green accent wall to our bathroom after seeing tons of inspiration all over our favorite blogs. 
  • Backgammon. What's your favorite way to relieve stress? Aside from the occasional Negroni or a night cooking dinner at home, playing backgammon has definitely become part of our weekend stress relief routine. 
  • Japanese travel. We're endlessly inspired by the simplicity and serenity of Japan's homes, landscapes and culture, and we've been dreaming of taking a trip all over the Japan. Remodelista's travel guide is especially inspiring.  
  • Drake. We only love our bed and our mama... and the new(ish) Drake song. We're sorry.

Architect Spotlight: Richard Neutra

We look for inspiration in lots of different places, but there's no better place to go for inspiration than straight to the source. When 1767 started moving into the design world, we began learning all we could about history's best architects, picking up bits and pieces of their styles and finding new and creative ways to approach our own projects.

We frequently post inspirational shots from these architects over on our Instagram page, and lots of you seemed just as interested in them as we are. That's when we got the idea to feature one of our favorite architects each month here on our blog to help share what we're learning, show you where our inspiration comes from and (of course) give you some serious #HousePorn to look at. 

  via Getty

via Getty

Our first featured architect is Richard Neutra — master of modernism, lover of art and fellow Californian (though he was originally born in Austria). Neutra worked briefly under Frank Lloyd Wright, but he owes most of his education in architecture to European architects like Gustav AmmannErich Mendelsohn and Rudolf Schindler. Neutra worked under Schindler in Southern California in the mid 1920s, and the work that they created together was so far ahead of its time, we'd swear it was from the mid century. 

  via Getty

via Getty

  via Getty

via Getty

Neutra first worked as a landscape architect when he arrived in California, designing gardens throughout areas like Newport Beach and Hollywood. After his architecture skills began catching up with his mentor Rudolf Schindler, the two went into business together (along with Carol Aronovici) to form the Architectural Group for Industry and Commerce, or AGIC. Their work was geometric, yet airy and open, creating what became known as the West Coast answer to the mid-century modern style. 

We love that Neutra emphasized function for the client, not just style — he was known for asking endless lists of questions before beginning any build so that he could really understand how the family would use the home. He created multipurpose rooms, blended the landscape into the home's design and made the floor plans open, accessible and airy. In a Los Angeles Times interview, Neutra famously called his homes "ready-for-anything".

  via Dwell

via Dwell

  via Dwell

via Dwell

  via Dwell

via Dwell

  via Dwell

via Dwell

  via Dwell

via Dwell

Design Travel Guide: Asheville, NC

Just a few hours from Nashville (and with a name that sounds crazy similar), Asheville is a great getaway for East Coasters or Southerners looking for a low-key road trip. This quirky mountain town is full of literary and music history, acclaimed restaurants and design-savvy cabins that make for the perfect weekend away. Here are a few of our favorite Asheville spots. 

  Image via  Sovereign Remedies
  • The Airbnbs. There are a few hotel options (like the luxe Windsor Boutique Hotel), but in such a friendly, communal city, we love to stay in an Airbnb. Options like this, this or this are quintessential Asheville, or if you're not set on staying right in the city, there are a ton of mountain cabins just outside. 
  • Sovereign Remedies. We love this cozy, narrow bar and restaurant for its eclectic vintage decor and its cool history (it was once the New Medical Building and a drugstore/barber shop). Grab a spot on the couch for a too-pretty-to-drink cocktail and an order of bone marrow tater tots. 
  • Burial Beer Co. Asheville is well known for its breweries (there are tons), and while you'll often hear about the totally worthwhile Wicked Weed, we're partial to Burial Beer Co. for its cool, industrial taproom, colorful murals and outdoor patio. 
  • Cúrate. This incredible tapas spot is pronounced "coo-rah-tay" rather than like the often-overused "curate," so let's get that out of the way first. Moving on to the food: if you're looking for seriously creative Spanish cuisine in a seriously stylish downtown Asheville location, this is the place. 
  • Tupelo Honey. If we had to bet on one restaurant in Asheville that you're going to hear about, it's this one. With cookbooks and press galore, this small chain of Southern-style breakfast spots originated in Asheville before expanding all the way to Texas, but we think it's still worth a visit to try the incredible biscuits and baked goods. 
  • East Fork. Being an independent artisan company, we love to find independent makers to support in other cities, and we think East Fork Pottery is doing it best in Asheville. Stop into their new downtown storefront to pick up handmade pour-overs, sets of dishes or their Instagram-popular mugs
  • The Black Mountain College Museum. This progressive college began in the mountains outside of Asheville in 1933, when artists were being persecuted all over the world. Refugees made their way from Nazi Germany to Asheville to form this experiment in artistic education, and it spawned some of the most influential writers, artists and leaders in American history over the next two decades. Today, the The Black Mountain College Museum is worth a visit to learn about the inspiring story and admire its graduates' art collections. 
  • The Grove Arcade. If you're looking for more architectural history, the Grove Arcade is one of the city's most interesting spots. This downtown marketplace was built in 1929, and today it's full of restaurants, shops, and an awesome outdoor artists market. 
  • The Biltmore Estate. It's huge. It's insane. It's pretty much everything you'd expect from the largest home in America. Even if you're the type to avoid "tourist" attractions, this one is worth a visit. 

 

How-To Series: Spring Home Refresh

We're all about new beginnings here, especially when they involve getting rid of things that aren't working to make space for things that do. That's why we love the whole idea of "spring cleaning": de-cluttering our home, making things more efficient and taking some time to reevaluate how things operate in our space.

Here are some of the things we're planning on doing to refresh our home and shop this season. 

  • Clear out the things you don't need. You know that book everyone always talks about? Well, you don't have to read it in order to get the idea: the Japanese are on to something when it comes to clearing out the unnecessary clutter in your life. We're looking forward to going through our belongings, asking ourselves if they still have value and donating the things that don't. 
  • Tackle those little projects. Whether you own your house or you rent, there are always little home improvement projects that pile up. From installing a new clothing rack in a closet to an entire bathroom renovation, now is a great time to set aside some time (and money) to get those reno jobs done. 
  • Prep your outdoor space. If you're anything like us, you think every hangout is more fun if it's outside. We're planning on making this the year that we finally make our patio a place for a few drinks with friends by adding some furniture, incorporating outdoor lighting and brightening it up with lots of plants. 
  • Switch out your linens. This one is pretty specific, but we love the idea of switching out heavy winter bedding and shabby towels with light linens for the warmer seasons. 
  • Make the most of your windows. Now that the days are longer and the temperatures are warmer, you'll likely be using your windows a lot more. Give them a thorough wash inside and out to clean off any winter debris, then trade in any heavy window treatments for light, white curtains or blinds that you can easily pull away. 

Our Favorite Things: February 2018

February came and went so fast we almost didn't even get a glimpse of it, but we managed to get a whole lot of work done (and squeeze in some down-time, too). If you're still holed up at home most nights waiting for winter to end, here are some great shows, documentaries, and online inspiration to help get you through that late-in-the-season chill. 

  image: dzek

image: dzek

  • The Mortified Guide on Netflix. This show is so hilarious, we couldn't help but binge it all at once. Everyone loves a good embarrassing high school story, and this show features real people reading excerpts from their high school diaries in front of a live audience.
  • Plotting warm-weather road trips. Did you see our last post about where to find Frank Lloyd Wright houses in Nashville? It got us dreaming about packing up our truck and hitting the road for somewhere nearby, but just far enough away. 
  • Terazzo tile. We kept seeing this image on Pinterest, and while it took a little while to grow on us, we're now thinking that we love terazzo tile. How do you guys feel about it? 
  • Vegan charcuterie. We've been experimenting with a lot more meat-free meals lately, and in our quest to cut down on meat, we've been finding lots of alternatives to our favorite dishes. The Fox (the bar that we designed and built out in East Nashville) serves a mean vegan charcuterie menu that you have to try if you're local to Nashville. 
  • Useful wood pieces. We love it when our customers come to us with a wild idea for a commissioned piece — in the past few months we've done a chess board and a triangular vanity mirror, just to name a couple. We're always open to discussing big ideas for pieces for your home, and we hope to do more fun projects like that this year. 

 

Where to Find Frank Lloyd Wright Homes Near Nashville

If you're anything like us, then you likely love Frank Lloyd Wright's incredible architecture. We take a lot of inspiration from the clean lines and natural elements of his homes and buildings, but it wasn't until recently that we learned that there are a few FLW sites within driving distance from our hometown of Nashville. 

If you love design and you're looking for an out-of-the-ordinary road trip destination, then you might want to consider planning a design road trip to check out a Frank Lloyd Wright home. Here are a few FLW spots within a few hours of Nashville to add to your summer road trip bucket list. 

 via Wikipedia/Jim Roberts

via Wikipedia/Jim Roberts

  • The Seamour Shavin House
    334 North Crest Road, Chattanooga, TN
    Around 2 hours driving

    This private residence was built in 1950 for Seamour and Gerte Shavin, and it's the only Frank Lloyd Wright building in all of Tennessee. It's built of treated Louisiana cypress wood and a similar stonework to Wright's famous Fallingwater, and it offers incredible views of the  Tennessee River and Lookout Mountain. 
 via Frank Lloyd Wright Trust

via Frank Lloyd Wright Trust

  • The Zeigler House
    509 Shelby Street, Frankfort, KY
    Around 3 hours driving

    This is the only FLW building in Kentucky, and it makes a fun little pit stop if you're heading up north. It's a private residence that someone still lives in today, but it's a great example of Wright's "prairie house" style.
 via wcpo.com

via wcpo.com

  • The Boswell House
    8805 Camargo Club Drive, Indian Hill, OH
    Just over 4 hours driving

    This L-shaped home is one of our favorite FLW houses. It's located just north of Cincinnati, and it's one of the few FLW houses that was still inhabited by the original owners (up until a few years ago, at least). The Boswell house was built in 1957, and it still has all of the incredible mid-century built-ins and textiles. 
 via Curbed

via Curbed

The Gerald Tonkens House
6980 Knoll Rd, Cincinnati, OH
Just over 4 hours driving
It's one of many FLW houses in the Cincinnati area, but it's definitely one of the coolest. The exterior of the "Usonian Automatic" home is made of concrete blocks and more than 400 windows, and the interior is made up of detailed ceilings, an open layout and original mid-century furniture. 

 via Fallingwater.org

via Fallingwater.org

  • Fallingwater 
    1491 Mill Run Rd, Mill Run, PA
    Just under 9 hours

    This one is a far one, but if you're making the drive to a Northern city like Pittsburgh, New York or Philadelphia, it's well worth the stop to see the most iconic home in American history. 

How-To Series: Hygge

Have you heard of this word “hygge”? It’s one of those trendy design terms that we’ve been seeing everywhere lately, but not a lot of people really know what it means. We did some digging (and even talked to a Danish friend) about the real meaning of hygge — and more importantly, how to pronounce it.

Hygge, pronounced “hue-guh,” is a Danish word that refers to a feeling that is a cozy, special or charming. It’s kind of a combination of not just the vibe of your home when the fireplace is roaring or there’s a loaf of banana bread in the oven, but also when the people you love are around and you’re conscious of taking the day a bit slower than usual. Is this making you feel all warm and fuzzy yet? Good — you’re halfway to hygge!

One of our favorite things about hygge is that it’s not a design trend per se (at least not in the sense of something you can purchase). You can’t go into a store and choose a hygge sofa in the same way you can choose a mid-century modern sofa; rather, it’s a feeling that you attach to the sofa once you curl up on it with a mug of coffee and a good book in hand. With that said, here are a few of the ways that you can try to add a bit more hygge to your home this winter.

 Image: autumnfever

Image: autumnfever

  • Use the things in the home rather than buying new things. From dusting off that French press that takes a bit longer than the modern coffee maker to appreciating a pair of boots with a lot of life in them instead of buying a new pair, embracing the old-yet-useful things in your home is a great way to create a feeling of hygge.
  • Invite friends over and attach memories to your home. Especially during the cold winter months, it can be easy to hole up in your home and let the weather get you down. Invite a couple friends over for a home-cooked meal or plan a brunch at your kitchen table instead of waiting in line at a restaurant to make your home feel like a warm, welcoming place.
  • Plan a night in — but really plan it. Instead of staying in simply because you have nothing better to do, plan your own night in to do all of your favorite “home” things. Light a few candles, crack open a new book, pour yourself a special drink and wrap up in a big blanket. Once you’re settled in, take a look around and appreciate all of these small comforts of home.
  • Talk to your housemates. Whether you live with a roommate, a partner or your family, many people get in the habit of orbiting their housemates rather than really interacting with them. Take some time out of your day to sit down and have a conversation with these loved ones to fill your home with an instant feeling of hygge.
  • Ignore the unfinished or underwhelming parts of your home. Sure, everyone has those corners of the home that can feel stressful to look at, but the art of hygge involves not letting these things get you down. Instead, look at your home as a long, slow project that will eventually get to where you want it to be — and more importantly, furnish it slowly with meaningful pieces that you won’t get tired of over time.